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High School

The teen years are a great time to homeschool your child. As your teen matures he becomes more self-directed and you as a parent become more of a facilitator and guide. With the plethora of wonderful homeschool materials available for high schoolers, this no longer needs to be a daunting task.

Course of Study:

First determine your course of study. A typical high school curriculum will include the following:

  • 4 units - language arts including literature, composition and speech
  • 3 units - social studies including 1 unit of U.S. History, 1/2 unit of U.S. Government and 1/2 unit economics and one other unit such as civics, geography or world history
  • 3 units - mathematics
  • 3 units - science including 1 unit of physical science and 1 unit of biology
  • 1 unit - physical education or 1/2 unit of physical education and 1/2 unit health
  • 3 units foreign language, native American language, fine arts or career and technical education
  • 5 units - electives
  • Other electives may include classes such as keyboarding, Bible, shop, home economics, computer science, typing, auto mechanics, child development, psychology, sociology, welding, photography, dance or family living.

Testing:

You will also want to make sure your teen does some of the following testing. Most of them have their own homeschool code.

  • 10th grade PLAN test 
  • 11th grade ASVAB (given by military recruiters assessing career strength areas) PSAT/NMSQT - Preliminary SAT and National Merit Qualifying test, ACT in February or April 
  • 12th grade  ACT retake in the fall for a better score

Records:

Keep the following records in a file to help with generating a transcript and high school/scholarship applications.    

  • Records of days present and absent
  • copies of annual statements of intent
  • copies of any testing results
  • immunization records
  • reading lists by grade
  • copies of certificates or newspaper articles on achievement
  • report cards from any classes taken at a public or private school or college level
  • samples of school work in each subject area
  • report cards for adding grades to transcript
  • yearly student summary page (include subjects, textbooks used, extra-curricular information, comments and promotion)
  • lesson plan books to refer to

Transcripts:

You will need to generate a transcript. This is important whether or not your child attends college. The transcript then becomes a permanent record which should be kept forever in a safe or safety deposit box with important papers. HSLDA has a transcript service available for a fee or you can generate your own using a spreadsheet.

Transcripts need to include the following information:

  • School information such as the school name, address and phone number, indicate that it is a home education program
  • The parent/administrator name
  • The student information including name and birthdate
  • Either the anticipated graduation date, or when complete the actual date
  • A listing of courses taken under each grade level
  • The grade and credit recieved for each course
  • Total credits learned each grade level and GPA for that year followed by a cumulative GPA
  • Indicate any classes taken that are dual credit for high school and college credit
  • A grading scale
  • Signature of the parent/administrator

Computing Grade point Average (GPA):

  • A - 4 points
  • B - 3 points
  • C - 2 points
  • D - 1 point
  • F - 0 points

Add up the scores and divide by the number of classes.  A one semester course would represent .5 of a class.  This number is the GPA.  Extend the decimal point two places.

Other Resources:

College Plus

Credits Before College

Fast Transcripts

North Dakota Scholarship   (instructions)

North Dakota Scholarship   (form)