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FAQs

Q:

What is homeschooling and how do I get started?

A:

The basis of home schooling or home education is founded in the fact that a family determines to educate their own children in the setting of their home. While this may seem like a new or radical idea, in reality it is not. The home education process is as old as mankind. The advent of compulsory attendance and the state-operated public school system caused the home education process to begin to decline. With the failure of our state-operated schools and the rediscovery of the home education process, we have seen this choice in education flourish.

Q:

How do I start?

A:

The first step is to understand the responsibility you are about to assume. The second step is to acquire your curriculum. Then, set up your administrative procedures. The fourth step is to withdraw your student from his existing school, then start a daily routine and pattern for schooling. These steps may not always fall into this pattern, but each must be addressed to have a successful home school.

Q:

Is homeschooling legal in Texas?

A:

Yes, homeschooling your children is completely legal! In 1994, the court case “Leeper vs. Arlington ISD” went all the way to the Texas Supreme Court. At each level, the court found in favor of the original decision. A home school must operate in a “bona-fide” manner, which means you must have a curriculum, whether of your own composition, computer/video source, or from a curriculum publisher, that at least covers the subjects of reading, writing, grammar, spelling, math and good citizenship. For more information on the legality and requirements of Texas homeschoolers, please contact the Texas Home School Coalition at 806-744-4441, or THSC

Q:

How much does home schooling cost?

A:

The cost to home school a student can vary from a hundred dollars or less per year, to several thousand per year. There are many determining factors: number of students, grade levels, types of curriculum purchased, outside classes, lessons, etc.

Q:

What are the qualifications to teach in a home school?

A:

The state of Texas places home schools in the same category as any non-state-accredited school. This could include any non-accredited private or church school. The state does not regulate those institutions and as such makes no qualifications for teachers.

Q:

To whom do I report, and how do I get grades for my students?

A:

Since homeschools are recognized as private schools in Texas, there are no boards or committees to which you report. The home school operates just like a private school. Grades and achievement levels are set and maintained by each home school. The parent, as school administrator, is the responsible party. If a parent does not fully understand this responsibility and undertake his duty in a very serious manner, his homeschool will not be successful.

Q:

Do I have to withdraw my child from his/her school?

A:

Yes. If your child is attending a public school now, you must go through the withdrawal procedure, just as you would if you were moving to another district. Remember, it is legal to homeschool your child, so you can tell the public school district why you are withdrawing your child. Some parents tell the office that their child will be going to a private or church school. You can visit the Texas Home School Coalition website for a 'sample letter of withdrawal. www.thsc.org If your child has never been enrolled in a school, as in a child just now old enough to attend school, you do not need to notify anyone.

Q:

Will the public school take my child back if we decide to quit homeschooling?

A:

Public schools will vary from district to district in how they handle re-admitting home educated students. Some may require the student to take placement tests. Please inquire at the school before you withdraw your student.

Q:

How does my child graduate from home school? Where does he get his diploma?

A:

Parents, as administrators of their home school, decide when their children will graduate from high school. So parents award their child their high school diplomas. And you can get yours from the same place public or private schools do -- a printing business or your home computer! Most state, regional, and local support groups have graduation ceremonies, complete with cap and gown. Support groups, however, do not provide any type of “accreditation.”

Q:

What about college?

A:

Colleges have admissions guidelines for all students. It isn’t just the high school diploma they look at -- it’s transcripts and SAT/ACT test scores. Home schooled students are attending colleges and universities all across the nation. Make inquiries at the school of your choice to determine their entry requirements.

Q:

What about socialization?

A:

The most important people your children need to interact with is your family. Support groups, churches, and other community organizations provide socialization for students. Many support groups offer programs for sports, arts, music, and more.