Lowcountry Christian Home Educators Association Lowcountry Christian Home Educators Association Lowcountry Christian Home Educators Association Lowcountry Christian Home Educators Association
 
How to Start Homeschooling

LCHEA Homeschool Orientation

LCHEA schedules homeschool orientation meetings periodically throughout the year. These meetings are open to both LCHEA and non-LCHEA members. Husbands and wives are encouraged to attend together. Here are a few of the questions that will be covered:

What is South Carolina Homeschool Law?
What is an accountability association?
How do I get started?
What kind of support/help is out there?
How do I choose the right curriculum?
How do I teach upper grades?
The orientation is always open to the public, so feel free to pass the information along to family and friends who might like to join us!

PLEASE REFER TO THE CALENDAR FOR OUR NEXT EVENT!

Cumpulsory Attendance Laws

SECTION 59-65-10 RESPONSIBILITY OF PARENT OR GUARDIAN; NOTIFICATION BY SCHOOL DISTRICT OF AVAILABILITY OF KINDERGARTEN; TRANSPORTATION FOR KINDERGARTEN PUPILS.

A. All parents or guardians shall cause their children or wards to attend regularly a public or private school or kindergarten of this State which has been approved by the State Board of Education or a member school of the South Carolina Independent Schools' Association or some similar organization, or a parochial, denominational, or church-related school, or other programs which have been approved by the State Board of Education from the school year in which the child or ward is five years of age before September first until the child or ward attains his seventeenth birthday or graduates from high school. A parent or guardian whose child or ward is not six years of age on or before the first day of September of a particular school year may elect for their child or ward not to attend kindergarten. For this purpose, the parent or guardian shall sign a written document making the election with the governing body of the school district in which the parent or guardian resides. The form of this written document must be prescribed by regulation of the Department of Education. Upon the written election being executed, that child or ward may not be required to attend kindergarten.

B. Each school district shall provide transportation to and from public school for all pupils enrolled in public kindergarten classes who request the transportation. Regulations of the State Board of Education governing the operation of school buses shall apply.

SECTION 59-65-20 PENALTY FOR FAILURE TO ENROLL OR CAUSE CHILD TO ATTEND SCHOOL.

Any parent or guardian who neglects to enroll his child or ward or refuses to make such child or ward attend school shall, upon conviction, be fined not more than fifty dollars or be imprisoned not more than thirty days; each day's absence shall constitute a separate offense; provided, the court may in its discretion suspend the sentence of anyone convicted of the provisions of this article.

SECTION 59-65-30 EXCEPTIONS. THE PROVISIONS OF THIS ARTICLE DO NOT APPLY TO:

A. A child who has been graduated from high school or has received the equivalent of a high school education from a school approved by the State Board of Education, or member school of South Carolina Independent Schools' Association, or a private school in existence at the time of the passage of this article;

B. A child who obtains a certificate from a psychologist certified by the State Department of Education or from a licensed physician stating that he is unable to attend school because of a physical or mental disability, provided there are no suitable special classes available for such child in the school district where he resides;

C. A child who has completed the eighth grade and who is determined by the court to be legally and gainfully employed whose employment is further determined by such court to be necessary for the maintenance of his home;

D. Reserved

E. A student who has a child and who is granted a temporary waiver from attendance by the district's attendance supervisor or his designee. The district attendance supervisor may grant a temporary waiver only if he determines that suitable day care is unavailable. The student must consult with the district supervisor or his designee in a timely manner to consider all available day care options or the district shall consider the student to be in violation of this chapter.

F. A child who has reached the age of sixteen years and whose further attendance in school, vocational school, or available special classes is determined by a court of competent jurisdiction to be disruptive to the educational program of the school, unproductive of further learning, or not in the best interest of the child, and who is authorized by the court to enter into suitable gainful employment under the supervision of the court until age seventeen is attained. However, prior to being exempted from the provisions of this article, the court may first require that the child concerned be examined physically and tested mentally to assist the court to determine whether or not gainful employment would be more suitable for the child than continued attendance in school. The examination and testing must be conducted by the Department of Youth Services or by any local agency which the court determines to be appropriate. The court shall revoke the exemption provided in this item upon a finding that the child fails to continue in his employment until reaching the age of seventeen years.

Home School Laws

SECTION 59-65-40 INSTRUCTION DURING THE SCHOOL TERM AT A PLACE OTHER THAN A SCHOOL MAY BE SUBSTITUTED FOR SCHOOL ATTENDANCE; PROVIDED, SUCH INSTRUCTION IS APPROVED BY THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION AS SUBSTANTIALLY EQUIVALENT TO INSTRUCTION GIVEN TO CHILDREN OF LIKE AGES IN THE PUBLIC OR PRIVATE SCHOOLS WHERE SUCH CHILDREN RESIDE.

A. Parents or guardians may teach their children at home if the instruction is approved by the district board of trustees of the district in which children reside. A district board of trustees shall approve home schooling programs which meet the following standards:

1.

a. the parent holds at least a high school diploma or the equivalent general educational development (GED) certificate or
b. has earned a baccalaureate degree;
2. the instructional day is at least four and one-half hours, excluding lunch and recesses, and the instructional year is at least one hundred eighty days;

3. the curriculum includes, but is not limited to, the basic instructional areas of reading, writing, mathematics, science, and social studies and in grades seven through twelve, composition and literature;

4. as evidence that a student is receiving regular instruction, the parent shall present a system for maintaining and maintain the following records for inspection upon reasonable notice by a representative of the school district:

a. a plan book, diary, or other written record indicating subjects taught and activities in which the student and parent engage;
b. a portfolio of samples of the student's academic work; and
c. a record of evaluations of the student's academic progress. A semiannual progress report including attendance records and individualized assessments of the student's academic progress in each of the basic instructional areas specified in item (3) must be submitted to the school district.
5. students must have access to library facilities;

6. students must participate in the annual statewide testing program and the Basic Skills Assessment Program approved by the State Board of Education for their appropriate grade level. The tests must be administered by a certified school district employee either with public school students or by special arrangement the student's place of instruction, at the parent's option. The parent is responsible for paying the test administrator if the test is administered at the student's home; and

7. parents must agree in writing to hold the district, the district board of trustees and the district's employees harmless for any educational deficiencies of the student sustained as a result of home instruction. At any time the school district determines that the parent is not maintaining the home school program in keeping with the standard specified in this section the district board of trustees shall notify the parent to correct the deficiencies within thirty days. If the deficiencies are not corrected within thirty days, the district board of trustees may withdraw its approval.
B. The district board of trustees shall provide for an application process which elicits the information necessary for processing the home schooling request, including a description of the program, the texts and materials to be used, the methods of program evaluation, and the place of instruction. Parents must be notified in advance of the date, place, and time of the meeting at which the application is considered by the board and parents may be heard at the meeting.

C. Within the first fifteen instructional days of the public school year, students participating in home instruction and eligible for enrollment in the first grade of the public schools must be tested to determine their readiness for the first grade using the readiness instrument approved by the State Board of Education for public school students. If a student is determined to be 'not ready' or is determined to lack the necessary emotional maturity, the parent must be advised by appropriate school district personnel whether a kindergarten or a first grade curriculum should be used for the child. Nothing in this section may be interpreted to conflict with a parent's right to exempt his child form kindergarten as provided in Section 59-65-10(A).

D. Should a student in a home schooling program score below the test requirements of the promotion standard prescribed for public school students by the State Board of Education for one year, the district board of trustees shall decide whether or not the student shall receive appropriate instructional placement in the public school, special services as a handicapped student, or home schooling with an instructional support system at parental expense. The right of a parent to enroll his child in a private or parochial school as provided in Section 59-65-10(A) is unaffected by this provision.

E. If a parent is denied permission to begin or continue home schooling by a district board of trustees, the decision of the school board may be appealed, within ten days, to the State Board of Education. Any appeal form the decision of the State Board of Education must be taken, within thirty days, to the family court.

SECTION 59-65-45 IN LIEU OF THE REQUIREMENTS OF 59-65-40 (THE HOME SCHOOLING LAW), PARENTS OR GUARDIANS MAY TEACH THEIR CHILDREN AT HOME IF THE INSTRUCTION IS CONDUCTED UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE SOUTH CAROLINA ASSOCIATION OF INDEPENDENT HOME SCHOOLS. BONA FIDE MEMBERSHIP AND CONTINUING COMPLIANCE WITH THE ACADEMIC STANDARDS OF SCAIHS EXEMPTS THE HOME SCHOOLER FROM THE FURTHER REQUIREMENTS OF 59-65-40.

The State Department of Education shall conduct annually a review of the associations standard to insure that requirements of the association, at a minimum include:

A. A parent must hold at least a high school diploma or the equivalent general education development (GED) Certificate;

B. the instructional year is at least 180 days;

C. the curriculum includes, but is limited to , the basic instructional areas of reading, writing, mathematics, science, and social studies, and in grades seen through twelve, compositions and literature.

By January thirtieth of each year, SCAIHS shall report the number and grade level of children home schooled through the association to the children's respective school districts.

SECTION 59-65-47 IN LIEU OF THE REQUIREMENTS OF SECTION 59-65-40 OR SECTION 59-65-45, PARENTS OR GUARDIANS MAY TEACH THEIR CHILDREN AT HOME IF THE INSTRUCTION IS CONDUCTED UNDER THE AUSPICES OF AN ASSOCIATION FOR HOMESCHOOLS WHICH HAS NO FEWER THAN FIFTY MEMBERS AND MEETS THE REQUIREMENTS OF THIS SECTION. BONA FIDE MEMBERSHIP AND CONTINUING COMPLIANCE WITH THE ACADEMIC STANDARD OF THE ASSOCIATION EXEMPTS THE HOME SCHOOL FROM THE FURTHER REQUIREMENTS OF SECTION 59-65-40 OR SECTION 59-65-45.

The State Department of Education shall conduct annually a review of the association standards to insure that requirements of the association, at a minimum, include:

A. A parent must hold at least a high school diploma or the equivalent general educational development (GED) certificate;

B. the instructional year is at least one hundred eighty days;

C. the curriculum includes, but is not limited to, the basic instructional areas of reading, writing, mathematics, science, and social studies, and in grades seven through twelve, composition and literature; and

D. educational records shall be maintained by the parent-teacher and include:

1. a plan book, diary, or other record indicating subjects taught and activities in which the student and parent-teacher engage;

2. a portfolio of samples of the student's academic work; and

3. a semi-annual progress report including attendance records and individualized documentation of the student's academic progress in each of the basic instructional areas specified in item (c) above.
By January thirtieth of each year, all associations shall report the number and grade level of children home schooled through the association to the children's respective school districts.

Recommended Reading

Recommended Reading List

Andreola, Karen. The Charlotte Mason Companion. A wonderful book that helps readers understand how to implement Charlotte’s ideas on educating children.

Beechick, Ruth. You Can Teach Your Child Successfully. Highly experienced teacher who convinces you you’re the best teacher for your children. After reading this book you no longer will feel that teachers know secrets that are hidden from you.

Bell, Debra. The Ultimate Guide to Homeschooling. A manual full of wit and wisdom. Covers the whys and hows of homeschooling, and everything in between!

Clarkson, Clay and Sally. Educating the Whole-Hearted Child. Challenging handbook that focuses on a home-centered learning approach that combines discipleship with educating children using “whole, living” books.

Farris, Vickie and Jayme. A Mom Just Like You. In a warm, practical style, this books gives home schooling moms encouragement for those days when the challenge seems overwhelming.

Fields, Christine M. Homeschooling the Challenging Child: A Practical Guide. Of the many reasons families choose to homeschool, one is that they may have children who cannot thrive within traditional education environments due to special, physical, or emotional needs. This book addresses the issues and offers advice.

Graham, Gayle. How to Home School. A Practical Approach. This is a working manual written by a homeschool mom. Easy to read. Guidance for such areas as organizing your home school; choosing curriculum; developing unit studies, record keeping; and much more!

Harris, Gregg. The Christian Home School. A good introduction to home education. demonstrates that teaching at home not only gives children a good education, but is important in developing a Christian value system.

Klicka, Christopher. The Right Choice: Home Schooling. A book that will prepare parents to meet opposition from family, friends, agencies, and uninformed outsiders.

Macaulay, Susan Schaeffer. For the Children’s Sake. A practical book that helps parents and teachers enrich childhood education by expanding learning opportunities to all areas of life.

Rupp, Rebecca. Home Learning Year by Year: How to Design a Homeschool Curriculum from Preschool Through High School. This is a comprehensive guide to designing a homeschool curriculum. Ms. Rupp presents a structured plan to ensure that children will learn what they need to know when they need to know it, from preschool through high school.

Schakelford, Luanne and Susan White. Survivors Guide to Schooling. Chapters include: Do Real People do this?, What Will the Neighbors Think?, Help! It’s Not Working!, What About Time for Us?.

Wise, Jessie & Bauer, Susan Wise. The Well-Trained Mind. A guide to Classical Education at Home. This book will instruct you, step by step, on how to give your child an academically rigorous, comprehensive education from preschool through high school-one that will train him or her to read, to think, to understand, to be well-rounded and curious about learning.

Wiener, Harvey S. Any Child Can Write. An engaging book that shows how parents can encourage their children to write.

Famous Homeschoolers

Famous Homeschoolers

Educators:

Frank Vandiver (President – Texas A&M)
Fred Terman (President – Stanford)
William Samuel Johnson (President Columbia)
John Witherspoon (President of Princeton)


Generals:

Stonewall Jackson
Robert E. Lee
Douglas MacArthur
George Patton


Inventors:

Alexander Graham Bell
Thomas Edison
Cyrus McCormick
Orville Wright & Wilbur Wright


Artists:

Claude Monet
Leonardo da Vinci
Jamie Wyeth
Andrew Wyeth
John Singleton Copley


Presidents:

George Washington
Thomas Jefferson
John Quincy Adams
James Madison
William Henry Harrison
John Tyler
Abraham Lincoln
Theodore Roosevelt
Woodrow Wilson
Franklin Delano Roosevelt


Scientists:

George Washington Carver
Pierre Curie
Albert Einstein
Booker T. Washington
Blaise Pascal


Statesmen:

Konrad Adenauer
Winston Churchill
Benjamin Franklin
Patrick Henry
William Penn
Henry Clay


United States Supreme Court Judges:

John Jay
John Marshall
John Rutledge


Composers:

Irving Berlin
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Anton Bruckner
Felix Mendelssohn
Francis Poulenc


Writers:

Hans Christian Anderson
Charles Dickens
Brett Harte
Mark Twain
Sean O’Casey
Phyllis Wheatley
Mercy Warren
Pearl S. Buck
Agatha Christie
C. S. Lewis
George Bernard Shaw


Religious Leaders:

Joan of Arc
Brigham Young
John & Charles Wesley
Jonathan Edwards
John Owen
William Cary
Dwight L. Moody
John Newton


Constitutional Convention Delegates:

George Washington – First President of the United States
James Madison – Fourth President of the United States
John Witherspoon – President of Princeton University
Benjamin Franklin – Inventor and Statesman
William S. Johnson – President of Columbia College
George Clymer – United States Representative
Charles Pickney III – Governor of South Carolina
John Francis Mercer – United States Representative
George Wythe – Justice of Virginia High Court
William Blount – United States Senator
Richard D. Spaight – Governor of North Carolina
John Rutledge – Chief Justice of United States Supreme Court
William Livingston – Governor of New Jersey
Richard Basset – Governor of Delaware
William Houston – Lawyer
William Few – United States Senator
George Mason


Others:

Charles Chaplin – Actor
George Rogers Clark – Explorer
Andrew Carnegie – Industrialist
Noel Coward – Playwright
John Burroughs – Naturalist
Bill Ridell – Newspaperman
Will Rogers – Humorist
Albert Schweitzer – Physician
Tamara McKinney – World Cup Skier
Jim Ryan – World Runner
Ansel Adams – Photographer
Charles Louis Montesquieu – Philosopher
John Stuart Mill – Economist
John Paul Jones – Father of the American Navy
Florence Nightingale – Nurse
Clara Barton – Founder of the American Red Cross
Abigail Adams – Wife of John Adams
Martha Washington – Wife of George Washington