Gloucester County Christian Home Schoolers Association Gloucester County Christian Home Schoolers Association Gloucester County Christian Home Schoolers Association Gloucester County Christian Home Schoolers Association Gloucester County Christian Home Schoolers Association Gloucester County Christian Home Schoolers Association
 

FAQs

Q:

What does GCCHSA stand for?

A:

The acronym stands for the Gloucester County Christian Home Schoolers Association, which is a group that serves home schoolers in Gloucester County, New Jersey, and its surrounding counties. Families join as members and, as such, are afforded the benefits of the group. The group is governed by parents elected to the General Board of Trustees.

Q:

Is it legal to home school in New Jersey?

A:

Since 1993, the practice has been legal in all 50 states. Regulations for home schooling vary widely from state to state. Some states require a state-approved curriculum, conduct home visits periodically, and require that home schooling parents be certified teachers. Others only require that you keep a child’s portfolio of schoolwork and have it evaluated by a certified teacher at the end of the year. Still others, like New Jersey, may not require a parent to have any contact with the state and have no minimum educational standards for the home schooling parent. (See NJ Legislature N.J.S.A. 18A:38-25.) For more information, go to http://www.enochnj.org.

Q:

Do you have to be a certified teacher to home school your children?

A:

A parent does not need to be a certified teacher to home school in New Jersey.

Q:

What if I have legal problems resulting from home schooling?

A:

Many families choose to join the HSLDA (Home School Legal Defense Association). For more information, go to http://www.hslda.org.

Q:

What if my child wants to play sports?

A:

Home schooled students are eligible to participate in township or community sports. Organized sports such as soccer, softball, baseball, basketball, roller hockey, and tennis are often offered by home school groups. Other students prefer to take lessons in karate, swimming, and fencing. Some private schools allow home schooled students to participate in their sports programs if the student is attending a class.

Q:

What about socialization?

A:

Socialization begins in the home, where each child must learn to interact with parents and siblings first. Character is shaped in children before they leave the home. Home schooled children are often involved in sports, community programs (like 4-H), co-ops, home school or community bands and choirs, and educational field trips. Many also volunteer their services at nursing homes or schools for the mentally challenged. Attending church provides multiple programs and youth groups for children. Home schooling more closely resembles the "real world" since, as adults, we routinely deal with people of varying ages. It also helps prevent peer dependency that occurs in a single-age classroom. However, there should always be a greater emphasis on academics than on socialization.

Q:

Do home schooled students go to college?

A:

Most home schoolers go on to college and do very well. Because of their drive, self-motivation, and involvement in extra-curricular activities, home schoolers are accepted at even the most prestigious colleges and universities.

Q:

What types of curriculum are available?

A:

The most common option is a traditional textbook curriculum, usually self-explanatory and/or containing teacher guides and additional resources for assistance. Another option is a textbook curriculum delivered via CD for computer, or a DVD for television in which the child becomes part of a video classroom. Families desiring a strong measure of structure should consider curricula offering pre-planned lessons and a well-defined course of study, perhaps even considering enrolling in a satellite school or on-line school offering ongoing counseling, oversight, and grading of material. Families desiring less structure might consider a unit study program or perhaps even developing their own curriculum from resources available at home and in the community.

Q:

How do I find curriculum?

A:

Curriculum can be viewed at annual curriculum fairs, such as those sponsored by ENOCH (Education Network of Christian Homeschoolers of New Jersey) and CHAP (Christian Homeschool Association of Pennsylvania). It can also be purchased directly from a publisher or supplier (e.g., A Beka Book, Bob Jones) or a satellite school (e.g., Christian Liberty), or can be ordered on-line from a distributor such as Christian Book Distributors.

Q:

Are there alternatives to teaching the more difficult subjects like algebra, geometry, and chemistry?

A:

Children can be tutored one-on-one by other parents or older students who are proficient in these subjects. A parent or other educator may offer to teach an advanced course to a group of students in his/her home or other location. Also, students may choose to take a course at a co-op, private school, or community college.

Q:

What is a co-op?

A:

A co-op is a group of students that meet weekly to enrich their learning through elective and special interest courses, usually taught by parents of the children involved. Creativity and individuality are stressed in these classes in an atmosphere that encourages social, emotional, physical, and intellectual growth and development of the child as a whole.

Q:

What testing services are available to students?

A:

Many home school groups offer yearly standardized testing such as the Iowa or Stanford Achievement Tests to its members. Qualifying parents can also administer these tests at home to their children. All parents can administer the California Achievement Tests. The PSATs and SATs can be taken at regional high schools.